Would the real black forest please stand up?

There are few things in this world as amazing as black forest cake. That melt in the mouth blending of chocolate and cream…heaven on a fork.

One of my brothers once enlisted my help in a survey to determine the best black forest cake in Nairobi. My best assignment to date. My duties involved sampling the cake of the day and giving a verdict. By the end of my task, I came to the conclusion that there were about four categories of cakes being sold as black forest cakes: horrible cakes that didn’t deserve the title ‘cake’, let alone the descriptor black forest; chocolate cakes masquerading as black forest cakes; ‘almost’ black forest cakes; and the real deal. What differentiated the cake categories was how much work had gone into them, and what would be required to transform them into the real deal. Continue reading

Being Feminine is a Superpower

Knowing your power is what creates humility, not knowing your power is what creates insecurity – ego.
– Nayyirah Waheed –

Be bold and mighty forces will come to your aid.
(A friend of mine, always says this)


Before being a woman, I am first a human being. I have desires, I have dreams and I have a right to chase them. Being a woman is a beautiful bonus; my strength, my soft skin and my ability to nurture life is more of a super power and I find it beautiful. Femininity is not something to hide or try to blend in, in a “man’s world”. Continue reading

Public Health and Epidemiology: My Story

dr_aida_asmelash_public_health_and-_epidemiologyMeet Dr. Aida Asmelash, the Clinical Research Site Leader and Research Associate at the Botswana Harvard Aids Institute. She is an experienced clinical researcher, with exposure to HIV/AIDS Research and several publications on the same. She is also the Network Program Leader for the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG). This is our interview with this global leader.

Question: Tell me about why you wanted to be a doctor and how you got into public health.
Aida: I have always had a great passion for helping others. Since I was a young girl, maybe 10 years old, I knew that I wanted to be either a nurse or a doctor. I completed high school and got a scholarship to study medicine. After medical school, I was posted in rural Ethiopia where I worked for about a year before proceeding to Europe for postgraduate studies in public health and epidemiology. Continue reading